Pulse newmasthead 10th anniv 2252x376px

Subscribe/Energize


new subscription

Join the 11,000+ who receive Pulse weekly



energize subscription 
Stop by the
Pulse newsstand and
energize your subscription
with a contribution and
keep Pulse vibrant

Our goal this year:
500 energized subscribers

So far: 187



epidermal tongues - summers

Comments   

# david verge 2014-03-24 00:54
Damnation,
it is almost as if you stabbed that haiku
bleeding out all of the clean images
and turned it into a medical thesis.
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# Alan Summers 2014-03-24 04:28
Quoting david verge:
Damnation,
it is almost as if you stabbed that haiku
bleeding out all of the clean images
and turned it into a medical thesis.


Some haiku are visceral indeed. Often the Victorianesque English translations of the Classic haikai writers of Japan don't show how language evolved in Japan, moving away from the Courtly Chinese to the everyday language of the emerging Merchants' use of Japanese.

Somewhat like Chaucer moving British language away from Courtly French.

warm regards,

Alan
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# George 2014-03-16 14:01
It may just be me, but what do epidermal tongue, scales, bones, and banana leaves have in common? Which category does this haiku fit into?

a)personal account of illness and healing
b)the humanistic practice of medicine
c)health care advocacy
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# Alan Summers 2014-03-17 13:56
Quoting George:
It may just be me, but what do epidermal tongue, scales, bones, and banana leaves have in common? Which category does this haiku fit into?

a)personal account of illness and healing
b)the humanistic practice of medicine
c)health care advocacy


Good questions!

Haiku is constantly in flux both within Japan and outside Japan.

e.g.

ni-ju oku kônen no gishyô omae no B-gata

twenty billion light-years of perjury: your blood type is “B”

Hoshinaga Fumio

http://www.modernhaiku.org/essays/HoshinagaFumio.html


warm regards,

Alan Summers
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# Alan Summers 2014-03-17 13:57
One feature of postamputationa l healing that has often attracted notice is the presence of epidermal “tongues” that extend downward from the wound surface…
Principles of Regenerative Biology edited by Bruce M. Carlson


The role of salivary epidermal growth factor (EGF) in wound healing of the tongue was studied in mice.
Effect of salivary epidermal growth factor on wound healing of tongue in mice.
Noguchi S1, Ohba Y, Oka T.


re chronic skin wounds etc…
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Promotes Wound Re-Epithelialis ation in Frog and Human Skin
Natalia T. Meier1,2., Iain S. Haslam3*., David M. Pattwell3.°Ëa, Guo-You Zhang1,4, Vladimir Emelianov2°Ëb, Roberto Paredes5°Ëc, Sebastian Debus6, Matthias Augustin7, Wolfgang Funk8, Enrique Amaya5, Jennifer E. Kloepper1, Matthew J. Hardman5, Ralf Paus1,3
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# Alan Summers 2014-03-18 13:01
The human skeleton has 270 bones at birth which reduces to 206 bones by adulthood after some bones have fused together. Amputees will fewer bones. Banana leaves are used for cooking food including pig flesh, supposedly the nearest type of animal in some medical experiments to humans.

We continue experimentation for hopefully good medical reasons, not for profit alone.

It’s been said that Japanese-langua ge haiku may have instigated the Surrealist Movement because of the juxtaposition technique in the poem. Surrealism is there to portray a truth or greater truth via extraordinary combinations of imagery.

Haiku are two part poems where those two parts can create an overall different image. That’s up to the reader, whether they can connect. Of course it won’t always happen.

warm regards,

Alan Summers
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# George 2014-03-23 19:37
Alan,

Thank you for the explanation. The background information that you provided is very helpful. Thank you for your contribution.
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote
# Alan Summers 2014-08-17 09:37
Quoting George:
Alan,

Thank you for the explanation. The background information that you provided is very helpful. Thank you for your contribution.


Many thanks George. I've appreciated all the comments, as haiku might have seemed an unusual choice for a poetry section, and that we are sometimes steeped in the classic translations of Basho. Haiku in Japan moves rapidly onwards as Basho himself would have approved of, as he was creating yet another new approach to this type of poetry quite literally on his deathbed.

kind regards,

Alan
Reply | Reply with quote | Quote