Month: May 2015

Pimped

Anne Whetzel

It’s two months into my second year of medical school, and I’m at the clinic, preparing to shadow Dr. Neiland, a primary-care physician.

I didn’t want to come here this morning.

Yesterday, one of my preceptors decided that it was my turn to be “pimped.” Pimping, in medical education, is when the preceptor asks you questions until you get one wrong. Then he asks more questions, highlighting your ignorance. Theoretically, this ensures that once he tells you the correct answer, you’ll never forget it. This works for some students, but not for me. I get defensive, and the right answer, whatever it is, goes in one ear and out the other.

heaven and earth 2 demetropolis

Heaven and Earth

Alicia Demetropolis

About the artist: 

Alicia Jean Demetropolis is an orthopedic exercise specialist and healthcare assistant and is certified in providing spiritual care to people at the end of life. She is a published author of fiction and nonfiction and writes and publishes a quarterly newsletter for the Olympic Peninsula. Called Death Over Coffee, it is meant to encourage “an open, fearless and healthy discussion on the topic of death and dying.” This is her first published photograph. “It is dedicated to Hank, a longtime client whom I just lost a few nights ago. Although his death was not unexpected, it was a traumatic loss for me and his family.”

About the artwork:

Heaven and Earth was taken early in the morning after an overnight shift with a client who says the rosary every night before bed. On those night shifts I fall peacefully asleep, hearing her words …

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He Ain’t Heavy

Edward Beal

In my decades as a psychiatrist, I’ve seen many different kinds of patients; only in the past five years, though, have I worked with soldiers.

I see them through TeleHealth, an organization that offers patients long-distance care via a sophisticated form of Skyping.

I originally took this job for financial reasons (during the economic downturn of 2008), but I quickly discovered its unique rewards.

Early on, for instance, as I stood waiting for an elevator, a quadriplegic soldier maneuvered his electric wheelchair alongside me.

When the doors opened, he looked up and said, “After you, sir.” That’s not a memory that fades.

A Vitruvian Man

Tabor Flickinger

He marked a copy of da Vinci’s sketch
To map his ailments: drew an arrow from
The eye to cataracts, the feet nerve pain.

The groin said hernia, the navel at
The center of it all colostomy.
He offers up this artifact to his

New doctor: fills the outline with a tale
Of his true flesh unique in variance
From all ideal cosmographies of man.

My little ray of hope Jaffery

A Little Ray of Hope

Tara Jaffery

About the artist: 

Tara Jaffery is an internist working in Shifa International Hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. She was a FAIMER (Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research) fellow at the time she took this photograph in late 2005, when northern Pakistan experienced the worst earthquake in its history. She sends this photograph “for the people of Nepal…a little ray of hope.”

About the artwork:

“When Nepal suffered its first catastrophic earthquake a few weeks ago, I remembered, in a flashback, horrific scenes of the October 2005 earthquake in northern Pakistan, which left 100,000 dead, countless injured and millions homeless. We received many of the most seriously injured people in our tertiary-care hospital in Islamabad. The complicated crush injuries and the sense of despair were beyond description. Villages were gone, cities reduced to rubble. Every victim had a heart-wrenching story of loss and tragedy. …

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Finding a Bed in Bedlam

Jo Marie Reilly

There’s a full moon tonight.

“That’s when crazy things happen,” my superstitious mom always says.

I’m a family physician doing weekend call at my urban community hospital. My pager rings incessantly. As I answer yet another call from the emergency room downstairs, I think, Maybe Mom has a point.

“Got a suicidal patient with nowhere to go,” the ER physician yells into the phone, against the background commotion. “This guy John has been here for three days. He’s casted on both feet and can’t walk. The insurance company’s authorization nurse says she can’t admit him because it’s not medically indicated–but if a doctor gives her an indication, she’ll authorize it. Can you do it?”

Wednesday’s Child

Cortney Davis

It was a Wednesday in late spring, 1972. I was a nursing student in my final months of training, eagerly awaiting graduation.

When I arrived on the maternity ward that morning, my nursing instructor told me that I’d be caring for a baby, only hours old, with special needs.

I thought she’d send me to the neonatal ICU. Instead, to my surprise, she motioned toward the linen closet, its doors closed tight.

“The baby was born without a complete brain,” she said. “A condition called anencephaly. He can’t see or hear. And,” she added, “they don’t expect he’ll live out the day. So try not to get attached.”

Soft Low

Soft

Livy Low

About the artist: 

Olivia (Livy) Low is a first-year medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. She is originally from Oakland, California. Ever since her father gave his old Nikon to her, she has been unable to stop taking photographs. For her, photography is an act of love. Her work can be seen at livylow.wordpress.com.

About the artwork:

“I’ve been thinking about what it means to become, to grow and to thrive despite the constant vulnerability that comes from being not only a medical student but also a young person creating space in the world. The inherent fragility of certain elements of nature–such as the soft petals of a flower–reminds me that when we fully inhabit that vulnerability, that capacity to become wounded or broken, we often find beauty and grace.”

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Soft

Livy Low

About the artist: 

Olivia (Livy) Low is a first-year medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. She is originally from Oakland, California. Ever since her father gave his old Nikon to her, she has been unable to stop taking photographs. For her, photography is an act of love. Her work can be seen at livylow.wordpress.com.

About the artwork:

“I’ve been thinking about what it means to become, to grow and to thrive despite the constant vulnerability that comes from being not only a medical student but also a young person creating space in the world. The inherent fragility of certain elements of nature–such as the soft petals of a flower–reminds me that when we fully inhabit that vulnerability, that capacity to become wounded or broken, we often find beauty and grace.”

Soft Read More »

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